Athens County

Rome, Athens County, Ohio Genealogy

The first person who settled in what is now Rome township was David Dailey, a veteran soldier of the revolution, and decidedly ” a character.” Born in Vermont in 1750, he removed to western New York after his discharge from the army, and thence to Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, whence he migrated in the year 1797 to the northwestern territory. With his family, consisting of two daughters and five sons, of whom Benonah H. Dailey, of Carthage township (the youngest son), is now the sole survivor, he came down the Ohio river in a pirogue to the mouth of the Hockhocking, and …

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Trimble, Athens County, Ohio History

Trimble township was originally a part of Ames, from which it was stricken off and separately organized in April, 1827, It lies at the extreme northern limit of the county, on the waters of Sunday creek, the main branch of which runs, somewhat centrally, from north to south, through the township. It was named after Governor Allen Trimble, one of the early governors of Ohio. The first settlement made in this township was by Solomon Tuttle, Sen., in 1802. He, with his son, Cyrus Tuttle, and his brother, Nial Tuttle, all from Vermont, settled on the main creek. Soon after …

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Trimble, Athens County, Ohio Genealogy

Jonathan Watkins, Sen., came from Athens township in 1803, and settled in the lower part of Trimble, and soon after Eliphalet Wheeler settled near him. Mr. Watkins was a blacksmith, but, like most of the early settlers, occasionally engaged in hunting. He shot a buffalo soon after settling in Trimble, and broke its fore leg. He pursued the animal, thus crippled, from Green’s run in Trimble township, across Wolf plains, and over the Hockhocking some distance, but failed to capture it. Samuel Clark settled here about 1820. James Bosworth, from Fall River, Massachusetts, came here in 18 2 1, but, …

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Troy, Athens County, Ohio Genealogy and History

This township was settled under the auspices of the Ohio Company in the year 1798-about a year after the settlement of Athens and Ames. Some events connected with its history can, however, be traced back to a period nearly twenty-five years prior to that date. We have referred elsewhere to ” Dunmore’s war” and to the building of a fort at the mouth of the Hockhocking in 1774. When the first settlers came into Troy in 1798, the outlines of Dunmore’s camping ground were plainly discernible. Over a tract containing about twenty acres young saplings and underbrush had grown up, …

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Athens County, Ohio Vital Records

Athens County, Ohio Birth Records The BMD Project Athens County, Ohio Birth records from the BMD project. Ohio, Athens – Birth Records – Family History Library Catalog Athens County, Ohio birth records Bowman, Mary L Record of registration and corrections of births, 1941-1995 Ohio. Probate Court (Athens County) Records of birth and death, 1867-1956 Athens County (Ohio). Probate Judge Athens County, Ohio birth records index: delayed registrations and corrections 1867-1977, recorded 1941 to 1985 Schumacher, Beverly Athens County, Ohio, birth records index, May 23, 1941 to April 2, 1985 : delayed registrations and corrections Schumacher, Beverly Birth record card file …

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Waterloo, Athens County, Ohio Genealogy and History

Waterloo was originally a part of Athens township, and was not separately organized till April, 1826. Joseph Hewitt and William Lowry were principally instrumental in securing the township organization. The name of Waterloo was suggested by General John Brown, of Athens. The first election for township officers was held April 3, 1826, at the house of Joseph Hewitt. Joseph Bullard, Abram Fee, and Silas Bingham were judges of the election, and Andrew Glass and Pardon C. Hewitt clerks. The following persons voted, viz : William Lowry, James Lowry, Joseph Hewitt, P. C. Hewitt, Ezekiel Robinett, Lemuel Robinett, Nathan Robinett, Wm. …

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York, Athens County, Ohio History

This township was a part of Ames until 1811, and then, on the organization of Dover, became a part of the latter township. York was separately organized in June, 1818, and the first election for township officers was held at the house of Ebenezer Blackstone. The population in 1820 was 341; in 1830 it was 871; in 1840 it was 1,601; in 1850 it was 1,391; in 1860 it was 1,836. The township is traversed by the Hocking Valley canal, which crosses it from northeast to southwest, and has heretofore furnished an excellent outlet for the coal which is mined …

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Athens County, Ohio Cemeteries

For considerably more than half a century after Athens Township was settled, the dead were buried in the old grave yard northwest of town, which was set apart for that use by the trustees of the university in 1806. The place never was ornamented to any extent, and for many years past only a few forest trees have given it their grateful shade. Here, a little apart from their surviving friends, rest the fathers of the village. The breezy call of incense-breathing morn, The swallow twittering from the straw-built shed, The cock’s shrill clarion or the echoing horn No more …

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Athens County, Ohio History

Athens County, Ohio History The county of Athens was established by the following act: “An act establishing the County of Athens. SECTION I. Be it enacted, etc., That so much of the county of Washington as is contained in the following boundaries, be and the same is hereby erected into a separate county, which shall be known by the name of Athens, viz : beginning at the southwest corner of township number ten, range seventeen; thence easterly with the line between Gallia and Washington counties, to the Ohio river; thence up said river to the mouth of Big Hockhocking river; …

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Dunmore’s War

Dunmore’s War Probably but few of the present inhabitants of Athens county are aware that a fort was established within its limits, and an army marched across its borders, led by an English earl, before the Revolutionary war. The building of Fort Gower at the mouth of the Hockhocking river, in what is now Troy township, and the march of Lord Dunmore’s army across the county, thirty years before its erection as a county, forms an interesting passage in our remote history before the earliest settlement by the whites. “Dunmore’s war” was the designation applied to a series of bloody …

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